Estudios científicos sobre hipertrofia

Este foro es de solo lectura para guardar información especialmente valiosa. Si considera que un hilo del foro de musculación merece ser incluído en este almacén, coménteselo al administrador o los moderadores, se lo agradecemos.

Moderadores: moderador suplente, admin

Cerrado
sebarc
Forero Vicioso
Forero Vicioso
Mensajes: 1083
Registrado: 12 Abr 2005 15:24
Ubicación: Argentina

Estudios científicos sobre hipertrofia

Mensaje por sebarc » 13 Mar 2007 15:11

Bueno decidí poner un par de estudios, el primero es un repaso de varios estudios buscando respuestas comunes sobre el entrenamiento de resistencia (con pesas) en la fuerza y ganancias de masa muscular magra, basadas en cuatro puntos fundamentales: intensidad, frecuencia, volumen, descanso (entre series).
Haciendo un breve resumen lo que queda en claro es lo siguiente:

Frecuencia: no hay practicamente diferencias en el incremento de la masa muscular magra entre entrenar un grupo muscular dos veces por semana y tres veces por semana. Sin embargo si comparamos dos-tres veces por semana con una vez por semana, se nota casi el doble de incremento masa muscular magra en el primer caso contra el segundo.

Intensidad: este repaso apoya la recomendación tipica de entrenar con cargas del 70%-85% de 1RM cuando entrenamos para hipertrofia, pero también se ve marcada hipertrofia con mas pesadas y livianas cargas.

Volumen: moderado volumen dan gran respuesta hipertrofica (aproximadamente entre 30 y 60 repeticiones), mas alla de estos número la respuesta disminuye.

Descanso (entre series): este repaso de estudios apoya la utilizacion de generosos descansos entre series, para permitir esfuerzos cercanos al maximo.



Sports Med. 2007;37(3):225-64.

The influence of frequency, intensity, volume and mode of strength training on whole muscle cross-sectional area in humans.

Wernbom M, Augustsson J, Thomee R.

Lundberg Laboratory for Human Muscle Function and Movement Analysis, Department of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goteborg University, Goteborg, Sweden.

Strength training is an important component in sports training and rehabilitation. Quantification of the dose-response relationships between training variables and the outcome is fundamental for the proper prescription of resistance training. The purpose of this comprehensive review was to identify dose-response relationships for the development of muscle hypertrophy by calculating the magnitudes and rates of increases in muscle cross-sectional area induced by varying levels of frequency, intensity and volume, as well as by different modes of strength training.Computer searches in the databases MEDLINE, SportDiscus((R)) and CINAHL((R)) were performed as well as hand searches of relevant journals, books and reference lists. The analysis was limited to the quadriceps femoris and the elbow flexors, since these were the only muscle groups that allowed for evaluations of dose-response trends. The modes of strength training were classified as dynamic external resistance (including free weights and weight machines), accommodating resistance (e.g. isokinetic and semi-isokinetic devices) and isometric resistance. The subcategories related to the types of muscle actions used. The results demonstrate that given sufficient frequency, intensity and volume of work, all three types of muscle actions can induce significant hypertrophy at an impressive rate and that, at present, there is insufficient evidence for the superiority of any mode and/or type of muscle action over other modes and types of training. Tentative dose-response relationships for each variable are outlined, based on the available evidence, and interactions between variables are discussed. In addition, recommendations for training and suggestions for further research are given.

Excerpts From the Discussion

Frequency

For quadriceps training with dynamic external resistance, the largest rate of gain in CSA (0.55% per day) was noted in the study[84] with the greatest training frequency (12 sessions per week). However, it should be noted that (i) this study lasted for only 2 weeks; (ii) the intensity was 20% of 1RM; and (iii) the training was performed in combination with partial vascular occlusion. Therefore, the results from this study should be viewed with caution when considering the application of extremely high frequencies in more conventional training. Furthermore, it is interesting to note that there was no training difference in the mean rates of increase in CSA between two and three sessions per week for DER.

For elbow flexor training with dynamic external resistance, the greatest rate of increase in CSA (0.59% per day; 17.7% total increase in CSA) was observed in a study[128] with a frequency of four times a week. The second, third, fourth highest increase in CSA rates noted were 0.42%, 0.38% and 0.32% per day, respectively. These three studies[125,126,132] used a frequency of three times per week. However, with the exception of these three studies, the average values suggest that there is relatively little difference between training the elbow flexors two or three times per week, in terms of the rate of increase in CSA (0.18% per day for both frequencies).

The results of Vikne et al.[79] and Wirth et al.[134] are remarkably similar despite using different muscle groups and training modes. In both reports, two and three sessions per week yielded almost twice the increase in muscle CSAwhen compared with one session, with no apparent further advantage for three versus two sessions.

Intensity

Thus, the results of this review support the typical recommendations with intensity levels of 70–85% of maximum when training for muscle hypertrophy, but also show that marked hypertrophy is possible at both higher and lower loads.

Volume

That said, figure 11, for the total repetitions for DER training of the elbow flexors, suggests a dose-response curve where greater gains in muscle muscle thickness were demonstrated with increasing volume (or duration) of work, but with diminishing returns as the volume increases further. Overall, moderate volumes (≈30–60 repetitions per session for DER training) appear to yield the largest responses.

Rest

Upon closer examination, it appears that when maximal or near-maximal efforts are used, it is advantageous to use long periods of rest. This is logical in light of the well known detrimental effects of fatigue on force production and electrical activity in the working muscle. If high levels of force and maximum recruitment of motor units are important
factors in stimulating muscle hypertrophy, it makes sense to use generous rest periods between sets and repetitions of near-maximal to maximal efforts.


-----------------------------------------

Bueno este otro clasico entre estudios, la comparación entre 1 serie vs multiples series (en este caso 3), en relación a ganancias de fuerza y masa muscular. El resultado para los que no hablan ingles fue el siguiente:
Para la parte superior del cuerpo no hubo diferencias entre 1 vs. Multiples series, pero si lo hubo para la parte inferior 41% vs 21% de aumento de masa muscular a favor de multiples series.

J Strength Cond Res. 2007 Feb;21(1):157-63. Related Articles


Dissimilar effects of one- and three-set strength training on strength and muscle mass gains in upper and lower body in untrained subjects.

Ronnestad BR, Egeland W, Kvamme NH, Refsnes PE, Kadi F, Raastad T.

Ronnestad, B.R., W. Egeland, N.H. Kvamme, P.E. Refsnes, F. Kadi, and T. Raastad. Dissimilar effects of one- and three-set strength training on strength and muscle mass gains in upper and lower body in untrained subjects. J. Strength Cond. Res. 21(1):157-163. 2007.-The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of single- and multiple-set strength training on hypertrophy and strength gains in untrained men. Twenty-one young men were randomly assigned to either the 3L-1UB group (trained 3 sets in leg exercises and 1 set in upper-body exercises; n = 11), or the 1L-3UB (trained 1 set in leg exercises and 3 sets in upper-body exercises; n = 10). Subjects trained 3 days per week for 11 weeks and each workout consisted of 3 leg exercises and 5 upper-body exercises. Training intensity varied between 10 repetition maximum (RM) and 7RM. Strength (1RM) was tested in all leg and upper-body exercises and in 2 isokinetic tests before training, and after 3, 6, 9, and 11 weeks of training. Cross sectional area (CSA) of thigh muscles and the trapezius muscle and body composition measures were performed before training, and after 5 and 11 weeks of training. The increase in 1RM from week 0 to 11 in the lower-body exercises was significantly higher in the 3L-1UB group than in the 1L-3UB group (41 vs. 21%; p < 0.001), while no difference existed between groups in upper-body exercises. Peak torque in maximal isokinetic knee-extension and thigh CSA increased more in the 3L-1UB group than in the 1L-3UB group (16 vs. 8%; p = 0.03 and 11 vs. 7%; p = 0.01, respectively), while there was no significant difference between groups in upper trapezius muscle CSA. The results demonstrate that 3-set strength training is superior to 1-set strength training with regard to strength and muscle mass gains in the leg muscles, while no difference exists between 1- and 3-set training in upper-body muscles in untrained men.

pinball
Forero Activo
Forero Activo
Mensajes: 281
Registrado: 02 May 2004 03:34

Mensaje por pinball » 13 Mar 2007 15:27

Muy bueno serbac. Segun esta frase " Sin embargo si comparamos dos-tres veces por semana con una vez por semana, se nota casi el doble de incremento masa muscular magra en el primer caso contra el segundo "

Es decir que segun el estudio por ejemplo si entrenamos pecho o espalda o cualquier otro grupo muscular de 2 a 3 veces por semana se obtendria mayores ganancias que una vez por semana ?

Saludos.

cargardu
Forero Vicioso
Forero Vicioso
Mensajes: 2223
Registrado: 16 Jul 2004 23:21
Ubicación: México

Mensaje por cargardu » 13 Mar 2007 17:55

Muy buen aporte sebarc, entrenar 2 veces por semana puede ser beneficioso claro regulada por intensidad y volumen, y claro dieta, foreros que he conocido de otros foros realizan esquemas varios basandose en realizar ciclos de fuerza (entiendase no siempre fuerza bajas reps 1-3 pueden ser 5 o 6) e hipetrofia (8-12 o incluso 6), estos pueden ser 1 semana de fuerza y una de hipetrofia o lo mas reciente que he visto todo dentro de 1 semana cayendo en una rutina de alta frecuencia, la mitad de la semana es fuerza y la otra es hipertrofia, pero no una hipertrofia completa sino yendo al fallo -1 o -2, siendo mas una rutina de sobrecompensacion para la rutina de fuerza hecha los primeros dias de la semana, logrando con esto resultados sorprendentes.

saludos

Fernin
Forero Vicioso
Forero Vicioso
Mensajes: 1205
Registrado: 18 Sep 2006 13:54

Mensaje por Fernin » 13 Mar 2007 18:12

Muy interesante.

Aunque en el segundo estudio se trata a sujetos no entrenados. No se si esto marcará alguna diferencia. :-?
Dissimilar effects of one- and three-set strength training on strength and muscle mass gains in upper and lower body in untrained subjects.
Nunca olvido una cara. Pero en su caso, estaré encantado de hacer una excepción.

sebarc
Forero Vicioso
Forero Vicioso
Mensajes: 1083
Registrado: 12 Abr 2005 15:24
Ubicación: Argentina

Mensaje por sebarc » 13 Mar 2007 23:53

pinball escribió:Muy bueno serbac. Segun esta frase " Sin embargo si comparamos dos-tres veces por semana con una vez por semana, se nota casi el doble de incremento masa muscular magra en el primer caso contra el segundo "

Es decir que segun el estudio por ejemplo si entrenamos pecho o espalda o cualquier otro grupo muscular de 2 a 3 veces por semana se obtendria mayores ganancias que una vez por semana ?

Saludos.
Exacto

pinball
Forero Activo
Forero Activo
Mensajes: 281
Registrado: 02 May 2004 03:34

Mensaje por pinball » 14 Mar 2007 01:02

Pues hombre no es q sea una tragedia pero me ha dejado un poco descolocado xq yo al igual q muchos sigo la tipica rutina weideriana de entrenar 3 dias a la semana distintos grupos musculares.....vamos q toco 2 grupos musculares 1 vez a la semana...


Que cosas. En fin, gracias Serbac.

Saludos.

Avatar de Usuario
stress
Moderador
Moderador
Mensajes: 5256
Registrado: 07 Oct 2004 11:20
Ubicación: Aquí

Mensaje por stress » 14 Mar 2007 07:26

lo de la frecuencia de entrenamiento tiene sus matices, para mi en lo que a teoria se refiere, veo mejor entrenar 2 veces cada grupo muscular a la semana, pero siempre respetando unos principios como cuidar el volumen de ejercicios, no llegar al agotamiento y utilizar solo ejercicios basicos.

En lo que se refiere a la practica, mis mejores resultado se han dado con rutinas tipicas de 3 dias, pero reduciendo el numero de series y entrenando a tope, y los competidores con los que entreno no les cabe en la cabeza otro tipo de entrenamientos que no sea un grupo muscular cada dia, y hay que verlos como estan.

Pues eso, lo mejor es conocerse y ver que es lo que mejor te funciona.

Avatar de Usuario
Prince
Forero Adicto
Forero Adicto
Mensajes: 602
Registrado: 22 Nov 2005 23:00

Mensaje por Prince » 14 Mar 2007 09:46

Aunque mi ingles no sea muy bueno gracias por el aporte sebarc. :wink:

Avatar de Usuario
DAMARPO
Forero Vicioso
Forero Vicioso
Mensajes: 9504
Registrado: 18 Sep 2002 03:17

Mensaje por DAMARPO » 14 Mar 2007 09:57

es que realmente, entrenas varios grupos a la semana, teniendo en cuenta el parte de los musculos "pequeños" en los movimientos de los grandes.

lo que veo es que cada vez hay mas opiniones, mas estudios, y que como monitor, tengo que estar bien al dia de todo ello....

lo cual me ilusiona, porque asi mi trabajo es mucho mas interesante, y evitamos ese "estancamiento" del que algun cliente se queja, eh stress? (como en otros post´s)



saludetes!!
Testear--->priorizar--->prescribir
Re-testear--->re-priorizar--->nueva prescripción

Avatar de Usuario
stress
Moderador
Moderador
Mensajes: 5256
Registrado: 07 Oct 2004 11:20
Ubicación: Aquí

Mensaje por stress » 14 Mar 2007 14:41

lo cual me ilusiona, porque asi mi trabajo es mucho mas interesante, y evitamos ese "estancamiento" del que algun cliente se queja, eh stress? (como en otros post´s)
Mas que para combatir el estancamiento, que hay quien se queja de ello pero son los menos, vienen bien para tener mas armas con las que luchar contra la monotonia en la planificacion de entrenamientos.

Se agradecen todos estos estudios, asi nos damos cuenta de que cada vez sabemos menos, jejeje :silly:

Avatar de Usuario
karkian
Forero Vicioso
Forero Vicioso
Mensajes: 9570
Registrado: 07 Dic 2004 21:17

Mensaje por karkian » 14 Mar 2007 23:37

Frecuencia: no hay practicamente diferencias en el incremento de la masa muscular magra entre entrenar un grupo muscular dos veces por semana y tres veces por semana
:o :o :o

Me gustaria saber el por que de eso...


Podrias poner la fuente?
...

sebarc
Forero Vicioso
Forero Vicioso
Mensajes: 1083
Registrado: 12 Abr 2005 15:24
Ubicación: Argentina

Mensaje por sebarc » 14 Mar 2007 23:52

karkian escribió:
Frecuencia: no hay practicamente diferencias en el incremento de la masa muscular magra entre entrenar un grupo muscular dos veces por semana y tres veces por semana
:o :o :o

Me gustaria saber el por que de eso...


Podrias poner la fuente?
El estudio es un resumen de muchos estudios, esta es la direcciòn
http://hypertrophy-research.com/phpBB/v ... .php?t=213

Realmente la mayoria de los estudios dicen que no hay casi diferencias entre entrenar dos y tres veces por semana en lo que a hipertrofia se refiere. Aca te dejo mas informacion.

J Strength Cond Res. 2007 Feb;21(1):204-7.
Effect of short-term equal-volume resistance training with different workout frequency on muscle mass and strength in untrained men and women.Candow DG, Burke DG.

Changes in muscle mass and strength will vary, depending on the volume and frequency of training. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of short-term equal-volume resistance training with different workout frequency on lean tissue mass and muscle strength. Twenty-nine untrained volunteers (27-58 years; 23 women, 6 men) were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 groups: group 1 (n = 15; 12 women, 3 men) trained 2 times per week and performed 3 sets of 10 repetitions to fatigue for 9 exercises, group 2 (n = 14; 11 women, 3 men) trained 3 times per week and performed 2 sets of 10 repetitions to fatigue for 9 exercises. Prior to and following training, whole-body lean tissue mass (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry) and strength (1 repetition maximum squat and bench press) were measured. Both groups increased lean tissue mass (2.2%), squat strength (28%), and bench press strength (22-30%) with training (p < 0.05), with no other differences. These results suggest that the volume of resistance training may be more important than frequency in developing muscle mass and strength in men and women initiating a resistance training program.

Aca hay otro tanto

http://hypertrophy-research.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=7

Avatar de Usuario
karkian
Forero Vicioso
Forero Vicioso
Mensajes: 9570
Registrado: 07 Dic 2004 21:17

Mensaje por karkian » 15 Mar 2007 04:18

Bueno,pues...Yo voy a dar mi experiencia:

En mi caso personal si he obtenido mejoras DEFINITIVAS en el aumento de la fuerza entrenando el musculo cada 48horas..En hypertrofia?CREO que no..
...

Cerrado